KONO, CUADRAS VICTORIUS IN TOKYO


December 31, 2013

TOKYO, JAPAN

WBA#2 ranked ex-world super-flyweight champ Kohei Kono (29-8, 12 KOs), 117, decked a tune-up bout prior to his already sanctioned WBA elimination bout with WBA interim titlist Denkaosen Kaovichit of Thailand here this March, when he showed his superior power in disposing of Thailandfs Dawut Manopkarnchang (8-7-1, 3 KOs), 115.5, at 0:50 of the third round beneath the WBC and WBA world title doubleheader on Tuesday in Tokyo, Japan. Kono, an aggressive infighter, once captured the WBA throne by upsetting Tepparith Kokietgym via fourth round knockout just a year ago, but forfeited it in his initial defense to WBA interim champ Liborio Solis by a controversial majority verdict last May. Since the overweight Venezuelan lost his title on the scale in his ill-fated unification bout with IBF ruler Daiki Kameda this December, the WBA throne logically became vacant with the leading available contenders (Denkaosen and Kono) to square off in a quest for the belt.

Kono, who looked like Manny Pacquiao with his similar moustache and beard, swarmed over the lanky Thailander, and decked him with a flurry of punches on two occasions with the bell coming to his rescue in the second. The ex-champ, in round three, accelerated his attack and floored the victim again with the refereefs well-received stoppage.

WBC #1 super-flyweight Mexican Carlos Cuadras (29-0, 24 KOs), 117.25, stunned the audience with his fluent speech in Japanese after his triumph rather than with his expected halt of Thailander Songsaenglek Phosuwangym (13-10, 4 KOs), 116.75, at 2:22 of the second session in a scheduled six. Cuadras, 25 and under his promotional agreement with Teiken Promotions, often appeared here in Japan and displayed his non-stop punching in demolishing Asian opponents. The hard-punching Mexican caught the Thailander with a solid right-left combination, sending him prone to prompt the reffs intervention. Donde aprendio japones? (Where did you learn Japanese?)

(12-31-2013)


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